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Press Release
For Immediate Release
Website: www.GetOutLandish.org
Online Press Kit with High Res. JPG Photos: www.getoutlandish.org/press-kit/

Want to Improve Growth in Your Community? Adopt this Secret Weapon
Land design website provides unique ways to preserve open space and design subdivisions

Milford, MI — Overdevelopment in communities across the country is turning many once charming towns into places lacking character, charm and nature. But it doesn’t have to be this way. A group of volunteers created the website www.GetOutLandish.org to provide little known land use information to citizens, landowners and city officials along with better subdivision design that’s proven to build greater wealth for homeowners while giving them access to more open lands and healthier, happier lives.

“There is a huge disconnect between people and the land. With kids not going outdoors as much it’s getting worse. We want to get people thinking differently about land and recognize that undeveloped lands, like working farms and ranches, and natural lands, are an asset to their communities. Many people move to rural areas for the open spaces and lifestyle. Planning commission members and paid planners, the people making the land use decisions, are often not aware of the land use choices featured on our website. Outdated development methods turn once rural communities into overdeveloped, traffic clogged, uninspiring places. People can visit our website to learn ways to preserve the valuable natural lands that make their communities prosperous. Forests, fields and working farms and ranches provide an important balance to economic development,” says co-founder Kirt Manecke.

Their website includes a Planning Commission Boot Camp www.getoutlandish.org/planning-commission-boot-camp to provide volunteer planning commission members and paid planners with critical information. And a web page is being created where people can even create their own conservation subdivisions using M&Ms as houses.

“Now is the time to make communities sustainable. Actually we are 50 years behind, but better late than never,” says Manecke. “There are a lot of communities struggling with growth. The information on our website is the secret weapon to ensuring quality development and growth.”

Manecke wants people to visit their website, click the “Take Action” button and share the website with local officials and planning commission members. Learn more at www.GetOutLandish.org.

END

Press Blurb/Brief
For Immediate Release
Website: www.GetOutLandish.org
Online Press Kit with High Res. JPG Photos: www.getoutlandish.org/press-kit/

Want to Improve Growth in Your Community? Adopt this Secret Weapon
Land design website provides unique ways to preserve open space and design subdivisions

Milford, MI — “Save Some for the Kids” is the tag line for the new website www.GetOutLandish.org. A group of volunteers created the website to provide little known land use information to citizens, landowners and city officials along with better subdivision design that’s proven to build greater wealth for homeowners while giving them access to more open lands and healthier, happier lives. Their website includes a Planning Commission Boot Camp www.getoutlandish.org/planning-commission-boot-camp to provide volunteer planning commission members and paid planners with critical information. A web page is being created where people can create their own conservation subdivisions using M&Ms as houses. Citizens can share the website with their local officials and planning commission members by clicking on the “Take Action” button at www.GetOutLandish.org.

END (OF PRESS RELEASE)

IMAGES

Conventional subdivision with 2 acre house lots and 55 home sites on a 130 acre site.

Site Map, Conventional Development (above)
Please credit Randall Arendt, “Conservation Design for Subdivisions”, Island Press, 1996

Conservation subdivision with just under 3/4 of an acre, 30,000 sq. ft., house lots with 55 home sites on a 130 acre site. The conservation subdivision preserves almost two-thirds of the site, 62%, 81 acres.

Site Map, Conservation Design (above)
Please credit Randall Arendt, “Conservation Design for Subdivisions”, Island Press, 1996

Farm with Cival War Battle-Related Resources
Conventional subdivision (second photo above) with two acre house lots vs. a conservation subdivision (photo directly above) with just under 3/4 of an acre, 30,000 sq. ft., house lots a 130 acre historic site. The conservation subdivision preserves almost two-thirds of the site, 62%, 81 acres, while allowing the SAME number of home sites (55).

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Trim’s Ridge in Rhode Island protects 3/4 of the site as open space in this ten acre neighborhood.

Trim’s Ridge (Rhode Island) (above)
The original farm stone wall and part of the farm pasture have been preserved at Trim’s Ridge, This ten-acre conservation design subdivision, located in New Harbor, New Shoreham, RI, protects 3/4 of the site as open space. The original zoning designated an unimaginative layout of ten one-acre lots, five on each side of a cul-de-sac, which would have destroyed the stone walls, pastures and natural areas. Thankfully, the developers were able to persuade local officials and neighbors to allow conservation subdivision design. Photo Credit: Randall Arendt

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Sugar Creek Preserve is a conservation subdivision in Walworth County, WI with 177-acres, over 69% of the site, permanently preserved as open space.

Sugar Creek Site Map (WI) (above)
Please credit Red Wing Land Company for image

Sugar Creek Preserve
Sugar Creek Preserve is a conservation subdivision with 52 homesites on 260 pristine acres in Walworth County’s Sugar Creek Valley. Originally zoned for 52, 5 acre house lots, the property was destined under conventional zoning to become filled with houses, lawns and streets as most trees would have been cleared, rolling hills graded flat and the lake, pond and stream shores filled with homes. Using conservation subdivision design, approximately 177-acres, over 69% of the site, is permanently preserved as open space, including a lake, pond and stream, while still allowing 52 home sites. Sugar Creek Preserve creates a haven for homeowners, while protecting the extraordinary woodlands, fields, pond and sparkling stream.

Lots range from 40,510 sq. ft. (.93 acres) to 187,448 SF (4.3 acres) with the average being 53,500 sq. ft. (1.3 acres). The proposed density yields 1 home site for every 5 acres of land. The site meets the conservation subdivision ordinance requirements in Walworth County, Wisconsin.

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The Ponds At Woodward Site Map (PA) (above)

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Two thirds of the property has been protected at The Ponds at Woodward.

The Ponds At Woodward (Pennslvania) (above)
Landowners turned down a developer’s proposal that would have destroyed the 50-acre orchard on this 120 acre property. Developer’s received a 62% greater return by preserving the orchard in a conservation design subdivision with 57 homes. As a result, two-thirds of the property has been permanently protected, including ten acres of mature woodlands and a working orchard (producing apples and peaches) encompassing more than 50 acres. Moreover, the family’s economic return was substantially increased over that which a conventional alternative would have generated. Photo credit: Randall Arendt

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Garnet Oaks contains 80 homes on 58 acres and preserves 51% of the land as open space.

Garnet Oaks (Pennsylvania) (above)
A large wooded area named the Rachel White Preserve (in photo) honors the farm estate that once occupied the site. Located in Bethel Township, PA, Garnet Oaks contains 80 homes on 58 acres and preserves 51% of the land as open space. Structures from the original estate are preserved including a stone wall. The original site — hilly and heavily wooded — featured trees at least 40 years old. The conservation design allowed the developer to preserve many of them. An extensive trail system meanders through the preserved natural areas and is constantly enjoyed by residents. According to the National Association of Homebuilders, sales were brisk and prices rose significantly during build out of the development. A detailed nature trail and historic guide is available for homeowners at Garnet Oaks. A local Boy Scout Troop built the trail system. Photo credit Randall Arendt

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Did You Know?
Between 1982 and 2010, the United States developed more than 24 million acres of agricultural land – an area the size of the states of Indiana and Rhode Island combined. Wasteful land use is typically the problem, not growth itself. Far more U.S. farmland is developed than is needed to provide housing for a growing population.